professional review guide for the ccs examination 2006 edition professional review guide for the ccs examinations

professional review guide for the ccs examination 2006 edition professional review guide for the ccs examinations

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professional review guide for the ccs examination 2006 edition professional review guide for the ccs examinationsI also treated today as the final test drives of the car as I drove both the 8 speed auto along with the manual. Drove an automatic 2SS first to get used to the car again. It had the magnetic ride suspension and dual mode exhaust. Drove the way I remembered( amazing). The LT1 is in my opinion the better sounding engine than the Coyote. The manual transmission car was a 1SS with only the dual mode exhaust. So it had normal dampers which was perfect because I did also wanted to see how the Camaro drove on the standard SS suspension. The Tremec in the Camaro is a whole lot better than the MT-82 that is in the Mustang GT. The Mustang GT would buck when getting the car moving and in the 1-2 shift. The 1-2 shifts were smooth in the Camaro despite my poor clutch work, but early on would still buck on getting the car moving. Later after I gave my mom a chance to drive the Camaro, we figured out why I had such an issue with getting it going and having it buck. I was just popping the clutch out too soon. After that, launches were a lot smoother. Pretty sure if I would go and drive the GT again, probably could solve the bucking getting it started issue at least since I was probably doing the same thing( couldn't change drivers in the Mustang because the Ford dealer kept their Mustangs with no freaking gas in the tank so had to keep the trips short). I absolutely loved the rev-matching feature the manual transmission has just for the sound. Downshift and the car automatically blips the throttle and sounds freaking amazing. Hill starting was a bit of an issue, but decided to use the parking brake trick to help out. Since the parking brake is electronic, just set it when you come to a stop at a red light and when it turns green, you can just release the brake without worry of rollback and the parking brake will automatically disengage when it senses forward motion.http://asea-admin.com/_userfiles/20200914053730.xml

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I did stall it a few times at the beginning and I apologize to the one person that was behind me after I stalled it twice in a row. Three things I didn't like about the manual transmission. First, it is hard to find 5th gear. When I first got in the car, I just rowed it through all the gears just to see where the gates were, and I went to go to 5th gear and consistently found reverse instead. Which goes into the second complaint. There is no manual form of reverse lockout. All the sticks I have driven had a way you had to move the shifter to put it into reverse( whether it was to push down on the shifter or pull up). Now I am sure the Tremec does have a reverse lock out as I was driving it, I would go all the way over to the right I obviously didn't destroy reverse by mistakingly shift into it looking for 5th, it would stop and I would push up to put it into 5th gear. I would like the manual lockout where I would have to do something to get it into reverse. But it would be something I would get used to. Though when I wanted fifth, I was very conscious about shifting into reverse by mistake so much, I would end up downshifting back into 3rd gear( benefit of the rev-matching feature was being able to immediately know I downshifted to 3rd instead of upshifting to 5th as I heard the car blipping the throttle). Third thing I hated is the classic 1-4 skip shift feature. As soon as the car would be out of warranty, would get a skip-shift eliminator. Side note on the experience, the magnetic ride suspension is absolutely worth the money. As noted above, the manual transmission car didn't have mag ride. Went on the same roads and hit the same bumps as we did with the automatic car that had mag ride. The standard suspension isn't horrible. But the car was able to absorb the bumps better with the magnetic dampers even in track mode. You could absolutely tell the difference.http://dasita.com/files/cura-3d-printing-manual.xml Who knows if there is a noticeable change in times on a track, but the magnetic ride control certainly helps with making the Camaro a better daily driver. Come February or so, all I will have to do is walk in, negotiate the deal, and order the car. I am still leaning towards the automatic. I had an absolute blast in the manual transmission Camaro and AFM is disabled in the manual transmission version. I am not against it per se, but the Gen IV Small Blocks had oil burning issues which went away if the person disabled AFM. Not sure if GM fixed it with the Gen V Small Blocks, but it would be one less issue. But as I was driving the car, I definitely was more focused on shifting, the clutch, etc than operating the rest of the vehicle( sorry to the person I blinded with my high beams). Now I am sure this would go away as I get 1-2 weeks of experience under my belt and it would become second nature. The big issue though is still will I still enjoy the manual transmission 5-7 years down the road and will I be able to tolerate stop and go traffic with it. It is a very easy manual transmission car to drive now that I figured out how to initially get the car moving, but doesn't change the fact stop and go won't be fun. And the fact I am constantly checking behind me cursing the people who stop right on my bumper giving me no room for any potential roll back. Still got 3 months to decide. And if I do end up keeping the Saturn, would definitely tip the scale towards the manual transmission. But if it will be my daily driver, I think I would still choose the automatic transmission.When I test drove a 2016 SS Manual it was like I had my old transmission in a new car, I could find every gear whenever I wanted, so I (personally) don't think there is any issues with the transmission, just a little seat time should cure all your concerns.https://www.becompta.be/emploi/boss-be5-manual On a side note I had the same exact feeling test driving a 2016 SRT Challenger manual, the gears where all right where they should be compared to my current daily driver.During all other situations.there's really no reason to be finding 5th. But if you did really want to, I've found that partially shifting into 6th, and then pushing straight upwards was a fine technique.You just have to trust it. It took me longer than most to get used to the manual and I do enjoy it now but it is a nightmare getting stuck in stop and go traffic. I used to use the e brake on hills but don't anymore. I want to try out an auto without MRC to see what both are like (mine is M6 with MRC).During all other situations.there's really no reason to be finding 5th. But if you did really want to, I've found that partially shifting into 6th, and then pushing straight upwards was a fine technique. The first two complaints I have( 5th gear and the lockout) will most likely go away with time and experience. But those were just the issues I had initially during the test drive. And they are relatively small issues for me. Wouldn't prevent me from choosing the manual. It's one of the easiest and most forgiving manuals I have driven.When I test drove a 2016 SS Manual it was like I had my old transmission in a new car, I could find every gear whenever I wanted, so I (personally) don't think there is any issues with the transmission, just a little seat time should cure all your concerns. On a side note I had the same exact feeling test driving a 2016 SRT Challenger manual, the gears where all right where they should be compared to my current daily driver. The skip shift (CAGS) eliminator was in my car within days of me bringing the car home. But I appreciate the engineering effort for this device to get the manual version to be exempt for the gas guzzler tax. I would not be concerned with that voiding your warranty, it's a plug in module in-line with existing cabling.http://juanguillermocadena.com/images/carrello-manuale-montascale.pdf You could easily remove it should you feel the need. On hills, I also find the hill assist to be a great feature, so you don't have to manually use the e-brake switch as you described. I know there are others that don't like it, but for me, it works well. I have many hills in my area, so it get's used a lot.It's not like you have to 'find' the way through that gate, but rather a smooth, fluid motion.It's not like you have to 'find' the way through that gate, but rather a smooth, fluid motion. My Saturn is my first car and it is an automatic. My only experience with manuals have been driving them around dealer lots when I worked as a lot attendant( which only required getting them moving, reverse, and maybe 1-2 shift) and when I drove the Regal GS around GM's milford proving grounds. So I do have very little experience rowing my own gears and daily driving a stick. The Mustang GT and now the Camaro SS being the first manuals I have taken on public roads which were of course test drives.My Saturn is my first car and it is an automatic. The Mustang GT and now the Camaro SS being the first manuals I have taken on public roads which were of course test drives.Manuals of yesteryear were very difficult to master. Very heavy mechanical clutches and very long throws. (test drive a 1970 challenger, if you have access, you?ll see) And they were easy to stall especially when engine was cold. But to get the total muscle car experience you have to have a manual tray. It is the only way. And these days it is great theft deterrent. So think twice about the auto, unless you will use the car for commuting and deal with New York traffic, hay wait a minute, that?s what I deal with. I have driven both and honestly can't decide which I like better in a ZL1. I have driven manual transmissions for 60 years, but modern automatics are clearly superior in many respects. Currently, my daily driver is manual and my weekend fun car is automatic.Automatic transmissions really came into prominence during the late 60's with the development of the th350, 400, and powerglide (powerglides are older) transmissions. I will say that within the last two decades, that automatic transmissions have become more efficient with overdrive features. With v8 power it is a well known fact that in straight line acceleration the auto shifts are faster. On a road course, manual shift has an advantage in that one can select speeds quicker than an auto. Road feel is also vastly different in a manual shift. It goes by preference, but many (myself included) have viewed that manuals will give a better feel for drivability and fun with the car. Manuals really have an advantage with smaller, low torque engines in that one can rev higher and develop more torque in the lower gears. Manuals are (by their nature) more challenging to learn and drive. Once you learn how to shift a manual drive, IMO they can be almost as easy to maneuver as an automatic.I was more concerned about things like durability, reliability and frictional loses to the rear wheels. Power loss to the rear wheels isn't an issue with a dual clutch automatic. But. I assume the automatic on the ZL1 is a conventional torque converter design.I just find a manual trans car more enjoyable to drive. To answer your tech question.Both are fairly stout, and reliable.Not mine, heard it somewhere.My apologies. I have read a number of threads about clutches going bad with low mileage. I have also read a number of threads about bad differentials, usually with manual transmissions (as far as I can determine). Back in my old drag racing days, drive line shock from dumping the clutch would cause these issues. That's why we switched to Powerglide.I assume these threads about bad clutches and rear ends in ZL1s are just a modern manifestation of those same old things. Or, are they indicative of a different problem?My apologies. I have read a number of threads about clutches going bad with low mileage. Or, are they indicative of a different problem? The problem is between the seat and the clutch pedal.I think your assumptions are correct. These cars are 5-6 years old now. The ones that have been heavily thrashed are showing symptoms, same old thing. I would suggest paying the price for low mileage and roll with it. They are a steal at 40K with less than 10K miles if you figure in the pleasure derived.I have also read a number of threads about bad differentials, usually with manual transmissions (as far as I can determine). The site may not work properly if you don't update your browser. If you do not update your browser, we suggest you visit old reddit. Press J to jump to the feed. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts Log In Sign Up User account menu 10 Automatic or Manual For the past 5 years I have always wanted a Camaro and now that I'm done school with a fairly decent job im looking into finally purchasing one. I may have found a 2SS that has peaked my interest but the one thing is it has a automatic engine. I've always thought that the best would be to go with manual but im here to ask you guys what would you suggest. Why would one be better than the other. Is it just personal preference for driving. From my understand the fuel consumption is essentially the same these days. Any info would be great. Another thing is im not an experienced manual driver, just practiced on my cousins car and seemed to pick it up quick. Not saying I would have difficulty learning, just another factor to keep in mind 29 comments share save hide report 78 Upvoted This thread is archived New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast Sort by best level 1 Comment deleted by user 5 years ago level 2 2013 Procharged 2SS 5 years ago I agree with this 100. Manual is fun and all. But there are times I wish I had a convenience of an auto. My wife can drive it so I am always going to be the dd if I want to take my car. Autos are stronger, and faster transmissions. I have driven stick most of my life but going to the Camaro was another learning curve in itself. Also you can't damage your engine with the paddles because of the nannies they have in place to prevent damage to your transmission. I've never driven a manual before, so I can't comment how much more fun they are, but all I'm going to say is I have a blast driving my 2LT everyday. I've owned it for almost 3 years now and it still puts a smile on my face. 5 share Report Save level 1 5 years ago Auto is fine but manual is more fun for sure. 3 share Report Save level 1 5 years ago If you enjoy driving, going up the canyons, speeding here and there, i would total recommend the manual. You get to become part of your car and it just makes driving more fun. If you dont care much for that get an auto. Also, driving a six speed in traffic everday sucks balls. Im stuck in traffic almost everyday but i wouldnt give it up because i enjoy my weekend canyon drives. 4 share Report Save level 1 5 years ago A note about your lack of experience driving stick. You shouldn't worry about it too much. 5th gens have hill start assist to keep you from rolling back on hill starts and the clutches are fairly forgiving. Go for it, you won't regret it. 2 share Report Save level 2 5 years ago As someone who's always driven manuals the hill start assist thing really annoys me. It's always coming on when I least expect it and confusing me at times when I'm generally doing something intricate. Definitely glad I asked getting lots of info from this sub. I have never in my life drove a manual, but I didn't care and bought a manual camaro. It's a lot of fun, it's a skill that can come in handy one day (even though learning is very easy, not many people can grasp the whole 2 feet thing), I believe the resell value is better later, and my dad would have totally called me a pussy if I got an automatic. I hated it at first. Driving it made me so nervous because I would be afraid of rolling back into the car behind me, and trust me, you notice how ridiculously close other vehicles get when you are driving a manual. Now I love it and I'm not scared to drive it anywhere. The only issues I have, and this is specific to the car not the transmission, is driving it to places where I don't know the parking situation. If I can't back in, then I don't park. It's too easy to hit the front end off the curb and the backup camera eliminates that. I personally would go for manual. 2 share Report Save level 1 5 years ago Someone should explain the actual engine differences. Manuals are fun and all but if you're going to build the car to drag or street race then you really can't beat a stalled auto imo. 2 share Report Save level 1 540BBC 5 years ago Manual, all the way. You won't regret it! 4 share Report Save level 1 5 years ago You'll always get mixed answers on this. After owning a 2002 trans am ws6 with an automatic trans which I first upgraded to a 3200rpm stall torque converter and then to a 4400rpm stall torque converter and a built auto trans, and then moving to a 2002 camaro 6-speed with a built trans and aftermarket clutch, I can defintiely say this: The auto transmission is the way to go if you care about drag racing the most. You'll never shift as fast as an auto and a big stall torque converter is amazing for racing. Also it's a good choice if you need someone else to drive your car bc you've been drinking or feeling lazy or tired or have an emergency. The manual transmission makes day to day driving so much more fun. Since I spent most of my time driving around town or for pleasure and not drag racing, I found the manual was the better choice for me. Now I'm driving a turbo charged 4 banger with 300hp. Big difference from the high HP ls1 powered cars I used to have but with the manual transmission and turbo, I still have a lot of fun driving every day. 1 share Report Save level 1 2013 5 years ago Its all preference. If i lived somewhere with stop and go traffic i might not like my manual, but its rare so it doesn't bother me at all. You'll get tired of the manual. Even if it takes you 5 years to get tired of it, you'll still be stuck changing gears early one morning, putting out twice as much effort than you feel like because it's 5:30 am. Manuals start out mostly fun, kind of annoying, and just become more annoying and less fun every single day you own one. 0 share Report Save level 2 5 years ago I like my manual. If I am driving early in the morning I just put it in a low gear and give it some revs and the sound perks me right up. All rights reserved Back to Top. Back in my old drag racing days, drive line shock from dumping the clutch would cause these issues.That's why we switched to Powerglide.I assume these threads about bad clutches and rear ends in ZL1s are just a modern manifestation of those same old things. Or, are they indicative of a different problem. The problem is between the seat and the clutch pedal.I think your assumptions are correct. Unfortunately, this is how we pay the bills and our authors. We would love for you to enjoy our content, we've worked hard on providing it. Please whitelist our site in your adblocker, refresh the page, and enjoy. Both of course, with the 6.2L LT1 V8, rated at 455 horsepower to the crank. On paper, the auto-equipped SS is said to finish the quarter mile in 12.3 seconds — the manual in 12.5 seconds. In the Silver Ice Metallic, auto 2SS, Lutz achieved a 12.21 second quarter-mile at 115 mph. With the Lemon Peel, manual 1SS, Lutz managed a 12.4 second quarter-mile, also at 115 mph. So many donuts, that the tires were deemed un-drivable at the end. Luckily, Bondurant Racing School was nearby with the rubber the Camaro needed. We welcome your submissions. See here for details. These findings may be accurate or the Auto laid down with some unknown issues. No two cars are identical. I’m sure he can work a manual better than the average person. Auto trans over the last few years have been outperforming manual and the test doesn’t need to be scientific. Both the real world and Chevy has tested it and the Auto has been faster. When it comes down to it, it’s about personal preference. Guys like the feel and control of a manual while others don’t care. It’s called bragging rights. You can also subscribe without commenting. Challenger Hellcat In Rev-Off: Video We also invite you to join other enthusiasts and fans in discussing The General in our GM Forums. Please note that GM Authority is a product of Motrolix LLC and is not sponsored, owned, or in any other way condoned by General Motors Company, its brands, subsidiaries, or partners. We also encourage you to check out our sister publications. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts Log in sign up User account menu 14 Automatic or Manual For the past 5 years I have always wanted a Camaro and now that I'm done school with a fairly decent job im looking into finally purchasing one. I've owned it for almost 3 years now and it still puts a smile on my face. Im stuck in traffic almost everyday but i wouldnt give it up because i enjoy my weekend canyon drives. Go for it, you won't regret it. People are just too scared to try. I personally would go for manual. Manuals are fun and all but if you're going to build the car to drag or street race then you really can't beat a stalled auto imo. You won't regret it. Big difference from the high HP ls1 powered cars I used to have but with the manual transmission and turbo, I still have a lot of fun driving every day. Best part of a manual is the extra theft deterrent. Manuals start out mostly fun, kind of annoying, and just become more annoying and less fun every single day you own one. Then I pretend I'm in the fast and furious and slam through the gears on the empty roads. All rights reserved Back to top. I currently own a M6 SS, and I do prefer the manual transmission car. I'm not opposed to owning an auto, and I am in fact looking at one today around 5pm. The big thing I do enjoy about my current M6 is that I can downshift and really enjoy the power on demand, where I have always felt in the past the autos did not have that. I have not yet driven an A10 model ZL1, so I cannot compare. Thoughts would be appreciated!I honestly dont find myself using the paddles at all unless I want to hold a gear like in the twisties. On the street you push the peddle and the trans always seems to find the sweet spot in the gears and it goes.right now.With the A10, tap the gas and it downshifts instantly and takes off. No searching for the right gear. Just instant acceleration. You'll be pleased. I doubt anyone with the A10 has buyer's remorse even if they preferred the M6. It basically is a toss up. Either way the car will be super fun!!I really like it I normally wouldn't be considering the A10 due to the cost, but I managed to luck out on a deal and I am seriously considering it now.When i read up on the auto 10 it sounded amazing. I had super high hopes. This car has far exceeded all my expectations. You just need to pop the throttle to get into performance shift mode.its more responsive in sport or track (or any five other modes under competitive driving). Downshifts for you.on up shifts between 2-5 its like a bike the way it riffles off shifts. I brought mine to a very reputable tuner to get his opinion.he hadn't driven on yet.It has a very aggressive tune but with 4 more gears and more agressive, how can you not like that. Love the paddles in the twisties.I was die hard manual until I drove one, it's nothing like past autos. It does what you when you want it to do it and shifts faster than any stick ever could. With that said, it doesn't connect you to the car like a manual does, if you're willing to give that up for speed and consistency then the auto is for you.Even though the auto is bad ass especially off the line and easier to launch. I test drove the A10 5 times and still couldn't be persuaded. Nothing beats the rev match. But off the line the A10 is a lot quicker. 1 thing i couldn't stand was dropping down into performance mode or getting it in that mode.Im sure it was in kill mode and in the right gear it just felt weird. And again no rev match.I'm sure its a preference thing. I do wish off the line I got a A10 sometimes.I also think down the line modding is less expensive and less hassle.I currently own a M6 SS, and I do prefer the manual transmission car. Thoughts would be appreciated. Very crisp shifts and very responsive. But it?s still just a torque converter based auto like in any other car. Durability wise, it?s the weakest link in the drivetrain. A few (more than will actually admit) members of the forum have had overheating and shift quality issues pushing hard during track use. But most will have no problems with it. As far as responsiveness, it?s fabulous. But it will never respond as well as an experienced manual driver can make an M6 respond. I bought the M6 because it?s my Sunday car and I live in the desert with little traffic. If I still lived in LA or any other city with traffic or if it was my daily driver, I?d take the a10.Tried to love the auto but just couldn't do it.I never drove the A10 and I wonder if it's that much better. I would say drive both. I don't drag race so getting off the line consistently never crossed my mind. Can't go wrong with either or tho. That’s the question anyone walking into an HSV showroom for a Chevrolet Camaro will face from here on out. It’s at this point some manufacturers would rule out the relevance of a manual, deeming circuit boards a better judge of clutch engagement with so much grunt. This is the same ’box as in the outgoing HSV Gen-F2 range, so that might go some way towards helping the 2SS manual feel familiar in hand. Yet we can’t recall a Holden or HSV ever shifting this smoothly. The lever is thinner than the chunky stub found in HSV’s old Gen F2 models and it’s also more contoured than a Mustang’s ball knob. It softly clunks at low speed if you’re slow on the release, but the Camaro’s Active Rev Match can hold revs on slow, lazy upshifts and blip them for downshifts. Yeah, we know only a numpty needs help doing that, but the clutch seems to bite twice on the release stroke and sometimes you fall out of sync. So it’s a welcome feature. You’ll find instructions for line-lock and launch control in the owner’s manual, the latter of which can vary wheelspin and rpm, but they’re not where they should be found in the car’s digital cluster menu. So it’s all down to your left leg and arm. Cruising around town is nicer too, as you can keep revs in the mid-range and enjoy the delicious off-throttle crackle of the bi-modal exhaust. Your contact details will be provided to a third-party dealer network so they can contact you directly. By clicking the send button you acknowledge that you have read and agree to abide by the Bauer Network Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy.Please try again later. Oops! For us to help you make an enquiry, we do need your help: Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. All Rights Reserved. We may earn money from the links on this page.As Dearborn had done with the Mustang in '64, General Motors wrapped pedestrian underpinnings in a sexier package. Yet, unlike Ford, which tapped Carroll Shelby to bring potency to its new car after its introduction, GM dropped some optional firecrackers under the hood of the Camaro right from the start, the most prominent of which were a range of beefy, small-block V-8 engines. While GM's most storied powerplant continues to find a home in the latest Camaro SS, the pairing's most significant update for 2019 is that the SS's LT1 6.2-liter V-8 can now be mated to an optional 10-speed automatic transmission. The small-block turned out to be so versatile that it has since powered everything from stripped-down hot rods to limited-production European exotica. And unlike Fiat Chrysler's modern not-quite-a-Hemi V-8 and Ford's current DOHC 5.0-liter V-8—both of which use branding to echo entirely unrelated engines—the 455-hp LT1 in the Camaro SS can trace its pushrod lineage straight back to its initial 4.3-liter configuration. The Camaros of the 1960s, with their deep-set gauges, had a real vibe to their cabins, and the modern, sixth-generation car carries that tradition on to perhaps a deleterious extreme. If you're the sort of driver who cares little about seeing what's behind you, Chevy's contemporary pony car is your steed. Mash the throttle and pray that those within spitting distance of your blind spots assume you're as aggro as the Camaro's angry mien suggests you are. Cabin materials also feel a step behind the most recent Dodge Challenger 's and at least two behind the latest Ford Mustang 's. The Camaro's trunk opening struggles to swallow a large duffel bag. And its revised-for-2019 nose, particularly on the SS model, is quizzically reminiscent of the new Chevrolet Silverado full-size pickup's, perhaps crossed with the face of the titular alien creature from the Predator films.

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